In an article for The Feminist Wire, Alicia Garcia, one of the co-founders of Black Lives Matter, wrote: “Black Lives Matter is an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise.”

Alicia Garcia’s description of the Black Lives Matter movement is crucial. When I write that I do not support Black Lives Matter, I am simply suggesting that I disagree with the organization’s ideological and political framework; I do not believe that Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise. In other words, I am not insinuating that black lives do not matter. Black lives matter. My argument, however, is truth matters too.

Before I explain why I do not support Black Lives Matter, I would like to detail why I am dedicating a series of articles on the organization. I am African-Canadian; I am a Ghanaian immigrant to Canada. So I may offer a different perspective on this matter than some of my black American peers. Still, I will cover Toronto’s Black Lives Matter organization at some point in this series, particularly, the controversy surrounding Andrew Loku’s death. However, Black Lives Matter is predominantly an American movement. Accordingly, I find it necessary to use data from American sources to challenge their claims.

Admittedly, I love investigating ideological and political topics. So I will thoroughly enjoy dedicating several articles on this topic. However, I am a Christian, so my intention is that I may “destroy arguments and every lofty opinion raised against the knowledge of God, and take every thought captive to obey Christ (2 Corinthians 10:5).” There is an allure of self-pity, favouritism, envy, and bitterness, which seem so prevalent within the Black Lives Matter movement. To be clear, I am not insinuating that every single supporter of the organization is guilty of these sins. I am merely writing that these sins are rampant within the movement. Nevertheless, I will specifically address these sins when I conclude this series. For now, I will simply explain why I do not support Black Lives Matter.

The Bible is clear: our God is just; He cares about (social) justice. Deuteronomy 32:4 says, “The Rock, his work is perfect, for all his ways are justice. A God of faithfulness and without iniquity, just and upright is he. Therefore, God commands all people to imitate His commitment to justice in Deuteronomy 24:17, which says: “You shall not pervert the justice due to the sojourner or to the fatherless, or take a widow’s garment in pledge.” In other words, God cares about social justice, and we should too.

Frequently, however, the world’s understanding of social justice opposes God’s. For example, the world considers pro-choice and LGBT-rights organizations as groups that advocate for social justice. We believers, of course, disagree. Our biblical understanding of gender, life and marriage lead us to disagree with these “social justice” groups. Black Lives Matter, according to its own feminist and LGBT leaders, is also inherently a feminist and LGBT-rights organization.

Like pro-choice activists who silence the cries of the millions of children being killed in abortion clinics, and like LGBT-rights activists who often infringe on religious liberty, Black Lives Matter activists are more harmful than helpful. We should not presume the legitimacy of Black Lives Matter’s claims. Instead, we should challenge their validity.

Black Lives Matter’s primary claim that police officers are systematically and intentionally killing black people because of the police’s supposed racist attitudes is not only a presumption that betrays Christ’s words in John 7:24, it is also baseless. According to The Counted, of the 1, 145 Americans killed by police officers last year, 304 of them (27% of the 1, 145) were black. The Counted’s study also reveals that police officers killed 582 white people (51% of the 1, 145) in America last year. Yes, police officers in America killed twice as many White Americans as they did Black Americans last year. Clearly, Black Lives Matter’s assertions that police officers kill Black Americans every 28 hours is untrue. These findings are not anomalous; they are consistent with every 21st-century data on the issue.

In fairness, these findings merely express half the story. Black people make up only 13% of the American population. So as inaccurate as Black Lives Matter’s words are on the matter, the findings do not change the reality that the number of Black Americans killed by police officers is disproportionately high (27%). Nor do they suggest that there are not racist police officers in America. Still, should we presume then that racism is the reason for the disparity? No, of course not. Consider that despite representing 50% of the American population, men make up 90% of the people killed by police officers in America last year. Should we conclude that police officers are systematically and intentionally killing men? Obviously, we should not. The simple answer for the disparity is that men are far more likely to commit violent crimes and thus encounter (and violently resist) police officers than women are.

Likewise, Black Americans make up 27% of the people killed by police officers because they, according to the FBI, represent 28% of the people arrested for crimes in America. If you are wondering why Black Americans—who make up only 13% of the population—represent 28% of the people arrested for crimes in America, it’s because a whopping 47% of American homicides are committed by black Americans, despite their relatively small population in the country.

Thus, Black Lives Matter is not only inherently a feminist and LGBT-rights organization, its claims are also untrue. The organization is fighting a non-existent war. Meanwhile, Black Americans are waging war—so to speak—against themselves, and last year, this war killed far more than the 304 black people killed by police officers. Yet, Black Lives Matter are not protesting that. Therefore, the next article, which will be published on Monday, is titled, “Do All Black Lives Matter?”

  • Nadine Aires

    As a preface, I am in no way saying that you need to align wholly with the Black Lives Matter movement. But, this flies in the face of an OVERWHELMING amount (at least) of legal, sociological, statistical, psychological, criminological Canadian research–research that absolutely disproves your main points and shows where the errors are in your statistical analysis. You may disagree with the methods employed by BLM, but to place blame wholly in the Black community or even suggest that racial profiling is a phantom battle is too simple of an analysis–even damaging for any equity and diversity efforts. If you choose to continue with the series, you should also consider how your overarching conclusion would colour the plight of Aboriginal persons in Canada.

    • SammySey

      Nadine,

      You did not confront any of the facts I shared in the article. I would appreciate that from you, because I don’t know which of the facts you disagree with. 😉

      You said: “But, this flies in the face of an OVERWHELMING amount (at least) of legal, sociological, statistical, psychological, criminological Canadian research–research that absolutely disproves your main points and shows where the errors are in your statistical analysis.”

      While I appreciate your passion for the matter, you didn’t really address anything here, sister. Still, let’s remember that pro-choice people, for example, also cite supposedly “overwhelming amount” evidence to support their incorrect stance. Point being, anyone can make claims that there are ample amount of evidence that support their claims. Black Lives Matter does the same, but as detailed in the article, they are incorrect. Plus, since I am predominantly referring to American research, I would appreciate it if we kept the conversation on that.

      You said: “You may disagree with the methods employed by BLM, but to place blame wholly in the Black community or even suggest that racial profiling is a phantom battle is too simple of an analysis–even damaging for any equity and diversity efforts.”

      Obviously, I disagree with you. I think that BLM’s Feminist/LGBT ideologies and their incorrect claims are more damaging to true equality and diversity than my analysis of the evidence that contradicts BLM’s views. Still, I did not place the blame wholly in the Black community. I did, in fact, suggest that we are primarily to blame. I do that because ultimately, as the Bible teaches, people are responsible for their own sins. We reap what we sow. I will offer a more detailed explanation of that in the next article.

      You said: “If you choose to continue with the series, you should also consider how your overarching conclusion would colour the plight of Aboriginal persons in Canada.”

      Thanks! I have been researching the problems within Aboriginal communities in Canada. I’m not yet sure that I’ll choose to include their struggles in this series, however. The series is already longer than I initially planned, lol.

      Thanks for commenting, sister!

  • Rick Myers

    Hello brother, I just got introduced to your site (a brother posted a link to your article on MacArthur and pastors, a perspective I really appreciate). I’m enjoying reading your articles, especially getting your perspective on racial issues. I know that this is an older article, but I I did want to point out what appears to be an error regarding the black lives matter claim about the frequency with which blacks are fatally shot by police officers in the US. You cite The Counted as saying that 304 black Americans were killed by police in the relevant year (2015?). And you go on to state, “Clearly, Black Lives Matter’s assertions that police officers kill Black Americans every 28 hours is untrue.”

    Actually, those numbers are in agreement. Days in a year X hours in a day give us hours in a year (8760). This divided by the number of shooting deaths in a year (304) is one death every 28.81 hours. Whatever the significance of that number in the overall analysis, on that point the BLM claim is true.

    This number would also generally comport with numbers you gave comparing police shooting deaths of black people from the time of Roe v Wade. You estimated 15,000 (compared to 15 million aborted black babies). Over 43 years that would be about one every 25 hours. Anyway, I offer this in the interest of clarity when opposing an overall problematic narrative.

    I’m encouraged by what I’ve read so far and look forward to reading more from you.

    • SammySey

      Thank you, Rick!

      I don’t know how I managed to fail so badly at math in this article. lol. But I thank you very much for pointing it out. Now, anyone who reads this article in the future will recognize my errors when they read your post. I’m also thankful that you actually did the math to ensure whether I was correct or incorrect. I really appreciate that. I will be much more careful with numbers in the future. 🙂