No matter what we think about it, our nations have adopted a crisis socialism to protect, in their mind, the common good and public health of all people—except preborn babies.

Concerns over the coronavirus have compelled nations to deem many businesses unessential, forcing many businesses and services into closure. However, our governments have declared abortion a crucial and essential business that protects the common good and public health of citizens during this pandemic.

That is obviously an inconsistent declaration by our governments. But it’s consistent with socialist history.

I am not suggesting that crisis socialism makes our nations officially socialist nations. And I am not suggesting our nations have declared abortion as an essential business because of their loyalty to socialism.

However, it’s not by accident that progressives and socialists in Canada and America lobby to keep Planned Parenthood and abortion centres open during the pandemic. Socialism and abortion are oppressive branches of one poisonous tree.

Abortion and socialism have been deeply connected throughout history. Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, was a socialist who gained significant followers by publishing her first articles in socialist magazines.

And throughout history, the most widespread abortions have been implemented by socialist regimes. Many of us are aware of communist China’s one-child policy—a policy designed to protect the nation’s socialist economy by forcing millions of women to get abortions. Between 1979 and 2015, communist China murdered over 400 million preborn babies through the one-child policy.

But many of us are unfamiliar with the Soviet Union’s legacy with abortion. The Soviet Union established abortion as an indispensable and essential business for socialist nations in 1920, three years after the Russian Revolution. Pro-abortion activists try to claim that Mexico is the first nation to legalize abortion, but that’s a lie apparently designed so disconnect the history between abortion and communism.

The Soviet Union legalized abortion eleven years before Mexico legalized abortion. The Mexican law on abortion in 1931 only made abortion legal if the mother was a victim of rape. That, of course, is still wrong. Women who get assaulted should receive support and justice—not abortions. Abortions for victims of rape create two victims of assault.

Nevertheless, abortions were still mostly illegal under the Mexican law. However, the Soviet Union law on abortion made abortion completely legal and completely funded with no restrictions in every circumstance. They were the first nation to create abortion on demand. The Soviet Union law was so radical at the time, that even today, a hundred years later—only Canada and two communist nations, China and North Korea maintain the same law.

Perhaps nothing captures the Soviet Union’s legacy on abortion and the relationship between socialism and abortion better than this: the top 14 nations with the highest abortion rates in the world are either former Soviet Union states or current or formerly communist nations.

Abortion is just as fundamental to socialist nations as socialized health care. In fact, that’s why Planned Parenthood established a strong relationship with Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign. Socialism protects abortion laws.

But why is that? Why is abortion essential business for socialist nations? It’s simple: socialism prioritizes the perceived common good of an entire nation at the expense of the rights of individuals—rights like life and liberty.

Human rights abuses against inconvenient and unwanted people isn’t uncommon in socialist and communist nations. However, abortion is the largest, though most understated human rights abuse under socialist nations.

Crisis socialism isn’t protecting our most inconvenient and unwanted people: preborn babies. Instead, it’s declared that murdering preborn babies is essential business. Crisis socialism—like all kinds of socialism—is a tainted ideology that sacrifices too much and too many people for the supposed common good. I think we need to think about that.